An up close shot of a woman in a dress walking through a field

“Letters to My Younger Self” is a series focused on wisdom and self-awareness. Just as you write letters to a friend to encourage and uplift them, here is the advice we would go back and tell our younger selves.

This is your time to try, explore and test things out. This is a good thing. I know it feels incredibly nerve-racking, post-college, with nothing lined up other than moving alone to the midwest to see where this previously long-distance relationship is going. 

More than nerves, you feel unsure about almost everything. Comparison is easy because it looks like other people know what they want or they are doing what they set out to do. Don’t fall for it. More people are nervous about the future than you think.

There should really be a handbook for this stage of life. If there was one, then it might simply be called “Awkward.” Just awkward.

Because that is what post-college life can be like. It’s hard to keep your chin up when it feels like no one is hiring in your field of interest, but enjoy the pace of your part-time jobs and always be proud of yourself.

What you do is not your worth. You are not disappointing anyone. It may seem like you are just wandering but sometimes that’s what living looks like.

It may seem like you are just wandering but sometimes that’s what living looks like.

This stage of life might be a whole lot easier if your mom was here, and I know it feels unfair that she’s gone. It is. It will still feel that way 10 years down the road. In the midst of that, you’ll still find moments of beauty. 

You are stronger and braver than you think. You are creative and kind. You have a drive that pushes you to leave your comfort zone and try new things. 

So, be bold. Be confident. Choose joy. Your purpose runs deeper than cultural priorities: finding approval, using your degree or making the “smart,” logical choices.

Make those lattes. Wait on those tables. Spend late nights at coffee shops writing away because this is your season and chapter to try. 

I respect you for trying. You are collecting experiences that will be more valuable than you could ever know. 

What advice would you give to your post-grad self? Are you familiar with the feeling of being in a season of wandering?

Image via Jen Suarez

12 comments

  1. This came to me at a time when I had just moved to San Diego post-grad, partly to figure out if things would realistically work out with my long distance boyfriend of 5 years and also partly to embark on an adventure of unknown. I quit my first job, moved out of my home town, and graduated college all in the name of new beginnings. It’s turned out to be a lot harder than I thought (coven hasn’t made it easier). At times I feel like I am just failing at life because its nothing like the romanticized version I had conjured up. I want so badly to prove to the people that told me to not quit a job before getting another one or that moving someplace for a boy is a bad idea that I am growing and reaching, despite everything going against me. I mean, the REACH is the hardest but most beautiful part of life. I revisited this piece just in time to remember that. Thank you for making me feel less alone.

    1. Kylee, thank you so much for sharing. We are so glad that’s Ceci’s words come help you know that you are not alone. We are all learning and growing. It’s amazing that you took a risk on yourself and made the move. No matter the bumps along the way, you are learning and growing, even in the hard parts. We hope you find moments of rest and joy in this process of change.

    2. Thank you for reading and sharing what you have/are experiencing Kylee!
      Life is full of risks and you never know until you try. I am believing that there is meaning in this season for you!
      You’re totally not alone!

    1. Thank you for sharing Charmaine! I am sorry you experienced that, I hope you know that you’re never alone. You are lovely!

  2. beautiful!

    i would tell my younger self to trust me; that maybe i do know what’s best. and that self-destruction isn’t the answer.

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