A woman holding a Nikon camera with the strap around her neck as she looks onward

We all love affirmation. A single acknowledgement can be wonderful. It can make us feel special and the feeling can become addicting. While hearing validation from one person is great, it can lead us down the path of craving the validation of many. When this happens, our priorities can become skewed, and we inadvertently dismiss the value of the one.

Lately, I’ve been challenged by the “why” behind my motives for doing the things I do. A pause and reflection is sometimes a welcomed cleansing for my soul.

In recent days, I have been bombarded with a list of to-do’s. Some things involving my writing and some relating to personal obligations. Regardless, I found that my reasons for doing them can sometimes be blurred by my selfish desires. Priorities seem to shift and change depending upon the potential accolades I receive for each one.

Am I serving the quantitative praise of many or the quality found in just serving the one?

My writing is meant to reach the masses, but what if it only resonates with one person? Are they enough for me to continue sharing my thoughts, feelings and vulnerabilities? In a world where more is better, we sometimes undervalue the significance that can be found in reaching just one person.

We sometimes undervalue the significance that can be found in reaching just one person.

Putting in our efforts into something bigger or that could draw more praise appears to make more sense. What about the one? The one who hides in the midst of many and clicks the like button on a post that resonated with them after experiencing a difficult day or season. Reading a thousand public affirmations won’t compare to the private impact on one person.

I had to reconcile with this reality—my writing career might never reach the next level and serve the masses, but the one who needs to hear my story or message is enough. My intentions always need to be directed toward the one.

My writing career might never reach the next level and serve the masses, but the one who needs to hear my story or message is enough.

Focusing on the one also spotlights other places in my life shadowed by my selfish desires. The one keeps me humble and shifts my self-centeredness into other-centered mode. The one reminds me that what I do has a purpose because it’s not about me. It’s about helping them.

The one is enough. The one has value. The one is worth it.

Who is your one? Is it a friend or family member? Or can they be found in the places and spaces you’ve overlooked because you didn’t see the value of something that they can bring back to you?

The masses are wonderful to reach, but the one is who transforms us. The one is who matters most.

What motivates you in your day-to-day pursuits? Are you living to make a positive impact on others or for approval?

Darling Issue No. 22

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

*